Sunday, June 29, 2014

Happy Birthday, America!





Friday is July 4th, and here in the United States, we'll celebrate our birthday as a nation. As with any "birthday party," celebrate, enjoy, be safe...and don't forget to take a moment and remember our military men and women serving our country, especially overseas. They're protecting us, and making it possible for us to celebrate America’s independence!

Happy July 4th!






                                                                              photo c/a southerfried and MorgueFile.com

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Oldies but Goodies in Children's Books...



Last week I went into my local bookstore to purchase books for a neighborhood child who was graduating Kindergarten and moving on to First Grade. While there were several recent releases by more contemporary authors that caught my eye, I kept wandering back to the display of authors that I had read as a child (more years ago than I want to recall). I ended up purchasing several Dr. Seuss books including The Places You'll Go.  The book's theme is crossing life's bridge and moving on to the next challenge.

After I'd spent almost an hour looking through books, my sister said to me, "Oh, I knew you were going to end up with Dr. Seuss." I just couldn't help myself as the messages in all of his book are timeless.

Thumbing through The Places You'll Go, and remembering how I continued to be drawn back to the Dr. Seuss display, made me think about characters and books written long ago, yet the sentiments, interest, themes, and teaching values will always remain.


Here are some of my favorites...Please feel free to share yours.



The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle

Yes, the caterpillar’s diet is inaccurate, but its food choices are appealing to children while teaching them numbers, the days of the week, and how a little nothing can evolve into a beautiful something.




The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

A sweet, simple, and detailed day in the life of a child traveling through his neighborhood after a snowfall. 



Make Way for The Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

A mother prepares for and tends to her babies…




The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf, illustrated by Robert Lawson

Be the person (or bull) you want to be, and not what others tell you to be.



Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Miline, illustrated by Ernest H. Shepard

Friends are what makes the world (or in this case, woods) go round.  




Have a great week, Everyone!



                                        photo,The Very Hungry Caterpillar c/o facebook.com/pages/Eric-Carle/78750984937
                                       photo, The Snowy Day c/o facebook.com/EzraJackKeats
                                      photo, Ducklings c/o Ladyheart and MorgueFile.com
                                      photo, Bull c/o Ali110 and MorgueFile.com
                                     photo, Winnie the Pooh c/o facebook.com/WinniethePooh

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Happy Father's Day!





My very best wishes to all the "dads" out there for a Happy Father's Day!



                             


                                                                                             photo c/o Natureworks and MorgueFile.com


Sunday, June 8, 2014

Happy Second Anniversary, Crimson Romance!


Crimson Romance, who published my novel, Magic Moment, celebrated its second anniversary on Wednesday, June 4th!  Along with sending a special “Happy Anniversary” SHOUT-OUT to all the fabulous folks working behind the scenes at Crimson, I’m spreading the word  for romance readers to check out the new look on Crimson’s website,www.crimsonromance.com

And, there’s more sensational news!

Crimson is celebrating the grand opening of its new e-bookstore (www.adamsmediastore.com/crimson-romance/offering amazing romances at great prices! Save 30% off hundreds of fantastic titles (discount shown at checkout), and when you buy five ebooks, you automatically get one free! Be sure to sign up for the weekly newsletter at the webpage to get extra opportunities for great savings in your inbox every week.

The e-bookstore is thrilling for those of us who work with Crimson. Several months ago I received an email with the details, and a request to submit a reworked, mini synopsis. Not only was it fun to see Magic Moment grouped with all of these fantastic Crimson titles, but exciting to click on Magic Moment’s cover and see the revised description in print! 

Check out Magic Moment listed under Romantic Suspense, or just click on http://www.adamsmediastore.com/ebook-magic-moment-epub 





So much excitement going on. Best wishes, Crimson, on your second anniversary and wishing you -- at least -- one hundred and two more!!! 

…Until next Sunday, Everyone, have a great week!






                                                       Crimson Romance image c/o Crimson Romance
                                                       rose pastries image c/o Melodi2 and MorgueFile.com


Sunday, June 1, 2014

A Touch of Emotion...

I saw this movie again the other night...which reminded me of a post from July, 2013. If you have a favorite movie that has you reaching for a tissue or two, please feel free to share.

Happy reading, and have a great week!




The other night I watched the movie “Back Street,” the 1961 version with Susan Hayward and John Gavin. The premise of the movie is a wealthy – and married – man (John Gavin) has an affair with a single, career-minded woman ( Susan Hayward). The couple is truly in love, but the husband has two small children and an alcoholic, self-centered wife (Vera Miles) who tried to commit suicide when he mentioned divorce. The Hayward character is content to be “the other woman.”

In the end, the husband and wife are killed when the car the wife is driving crashes.

The scene that breaks my heart and has me running for the tissues is the very last one. When the two devastated children come to visit a grieving Susan Hayward and tearfully ask if they could visit her from time to time, she gathers them in her arms.

The movie is actually based on a novel written by Fannie Hurst (since I haven't read the novel, I’m not sure how closely the 1961 version follows the book or earlier movie versions). As I cried my eyes out while Susan Hayward gazed at the grief-stricken children, I imagine an author at her computer typing out this scene and contemplated the power of the written word to touch our emotions.

What about you, readers? Has anyone seen an earlier version of "Back Street?" Are there any movies or books out there that have you crying long after the words, “The End”?





                                                                                               photo c/o sssh227 and MorgueFile.com